General Surgery

General Surgery refers to a discipline of medicine entailing the entire spectrum of surgical procedures, with in-depth knowledge of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, metabolism, pathology, intensive care, and immunology. General surgeons are adept at performing a range of invasive procedures but are predominantly focused on abdominal surgeries of the esophagus, i.e., food pipe, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, bile ducts, gall bladder, pancreas, and appendix.

Medway Hospital's General Surgery Department consists of a team of highly qualified surgeons along with world-class facilities, having consistently displayed successful outcomes in numerous surgical procedures over the past ten years. Equipped with sophisticated technologies and a skilled interdisciplinary team of medical practitioners - general surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists, and anesthesiologists, customized treatment options are provided to thousands of patients every year to ensure the best possible solutions to restore overall health.

A wide range of common types of general surgical protocols are performed, comprising:

  • Appendectomy

  • Breast surgery

  • Colon surgery

  • Endocrine surgery

  • Digestive tract surgery

  • Hernia surgery

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FAQ'S

Despite the term "widespread", surgeons that exercise widespread surgical procedures are particularly professional surgeons that generally function in not unusual places in belly proceedings inclusive of appendicitis, hernias, gallbladder surgeries, stomach, and intestinal issues.
Some of the more common surgeries performed are:
  • Appendectomy. ...
  • Breast biopsy. ...
  • Carotid Endarterectomy. ...
  • Cataract Surgery. ...
  • Cesarean section (also called a cesarean section). ...
  • Cholecystectomy. ...
  • Coronary artery bypass graft. ...
Abdominal adhesions can be severed during surgery. They are never completely removed. Instead, the ligament is cut to separate the organs from each other or the abdominal wall, doctors at the Premier Physician Network (PPN) say. Although some adhesions resolve on their own, abdominal adhesions that cause pain or discomfort should be surgically removed, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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